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In Our Interactions with Children, It’s Often What Happens in the Wings that Matters Most

Fred Rogers taught that small, ordinary moments can have great impact.

posted by Junlei Li

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Screenshot/ <a href=

Six Questions for the EdTech Field to Think About When Designing for the 0 to 8 Set

When studying media for early learning, researchers must keep equity at the forefront, says Shelley Pasnik.

posted by Shelley Pasnik

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For Infants and Toddlers in the Digital Age: Time with Adults Still Matters Most

The Rogers Center’s Michael Robb takes a look at what we know from the research about infants and media…

posted by Michael Robb

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The Teachers’ Innovation Project

September 16, 2014 | posted in: Early Childhood Education | comment

Melissa Butler in her Kindergarten classroom in Pittsburgh/ Photo: Ben Filio

What does meaningful technology education look like with young children? The Fred Rogers Center is helping teachers in Pittsburgh find out.

posted by Sarah Jackson

Back to School With the Maker Movement

September 08, 2014 | posted in: Early Childhood Education, Social Emotional Learning, STEM | comment

Photo/ <a href=

How the maker movement promotes social and emotional learning—through play.

posted by Sarah Jackson

What Really Counts in the “Word Gap Count”?

August 20, 2014 | posted in: Early Childhood Education, Family, Literacy, Research and Studies | comment

Photo courtesy of the Fred Rogers Company.

Fred Rogers promoted early language development long before a research study documented the “30-million word gap” between low-income children and their more affluent peers. Policymakers and programs are catching up.

This Summer, a Revised Mission for the Fred Rogers Center and for This Blog

August 05, 2014 | posted in: Fred Rogers Center News | comment

Screenshot/ ECS at Frick Park

In the spirit of Fred Rogers, we’re broadening our mission statement to focus on helping children grow as confident, competent, and caring human beings.

posted by Rick Fernandes

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